A Travellerspoint blog

October 2017

On my own in Nepal

Missing my travel partner

sunny 35 °C

As I sit here on the porch at Mr. B's place in Bardia National park in Nepal, I am surrounded by bird song, crickets and a beautiful garden of tropical flowers. The journey to this comfortable place was interesting. Kellie and I had read various accounts online about accessing Nepal from India. But we had no clear and current information about bus schedules, shared taxi rides, etc. Now on my own I had to trust in the process and work it out! So after leaving Kellie in the Delhi airport, I traveled on to Lucknow. Arriving at night in yet another seedy hood I found myself booked into a family room in the Central hotel. Now there were times that Kellie and I had trouble getting two beds. I now had four! I had to tell them I was only paying for what I booked and after some discussion, the manager relented. Since it was pretty bad, I raced out at 7:00 a.m. to grab a tuk tuk to the taxi stand. But got a rickshaw instead. It was surreal driving through downtown Lucknow at this hour with people just awakening on the streets to start their day. After haggling with the rickshaw driver who wanted more than he should have I found a taxi driver who had two others headed for the Rupidiaha border - we just had to grab them at the hospital! So I bought some breakfast quickly and we left. The two Nepalese men I shared the ride with were lovely even though one refused to get in the back with me. I hope they weren't in hospital for anything contagious because we shared the taxi for 3 and a half hours with horn blaring at 80 kmh all the way. Before the border you get out and walk. If nobody told you, you would walk right past the Indian immigration office. It's barely a building. It's half outside. Met with, "this visa is not valid" I had memories of Russia! The immigration official went on to explain that although I have a double entry visa I cannot return to India via this border. I can only enter again by plane. "Do you want me to stamp you out?", he asked. With Mr.B our safari host waiting for me somewhere in this mêlée, I said yes. And felt sick to my stomach for a few seconds while I thought about purchasing more flights - because of visas! Onward to the border. If I hadn't been so laden down with backpacks (bought too much in India) I would have taken a picture of the Indo-Nepali border crossing. And since I can't go back that way it's a lost opportunity. Walking further I asked a Nepalese soldier where to buy my visa. He led me to a tiny shack where I was to sign in. A young colleague of his came too, full of smiles and "welcome to Nepal." It was like filling in a guest register at a hotel (which by the way in Lucknow I had to list a husband or a father - even if you aren't married or they are deceased!). As I was writing, the young officer said,"ma'am you make mistake. This column your age." I said, "yes I put my age." He said, "no you make mistake. Is how old you are." I said, "yes I'm 55." He laughed and apologized explaining he thought I was 40 or 42. Gotta love him! But this wasn't the immigration office. That was another 1.5 km down the road. In the sun at 35 degrees. But I decided to walk so I could ponder my new travel arrangements. Buying a Nepalese visa is quick and painless. They even called Mr.B for me and he arrived just as they were pasting the visa into my passport. Three hours later we arrived at Mr. B's place in Bardia national park. After a wonderful sleep I started writing the beginning of this entry but had to stop to spend all day booking flights! And worrying about transiting back through India before leaving the country altogether as I can't enter three times (after Sri Lanka). Oh well.... Tomorrow I start a safari camping in the jungle for two nights. Since I will be away from technology for a few days I thought I would post this latest little adventure with a couple of pictures. Wish you were here Kel!

Entrance to Bardia national park

Entrance to Bardia national park

Fields behind my cabin

Fields behind my cabin

Mrs. B's garden

Mrs. B's garden

Outside my front door

Outside my front door

Posted by kelshell 15:31 Archived in Nepal Comments (2)

Incredible India

How to feel welcome in McLeod Ganj

sunny 26 °C

All you have to do is smile and be friendly and you are part of the community here. But it wouldn't be fair to neglect Delhi. Arriving in the middle of the night only allowed us to imagine how green Delhi was. We wouldn't actually realize how many trees and flowering shrubs there were until the daytime. Well, not right in downtown Delhi where we stayed of course but leaving that area it becomes greener and greener. The people in Delhi couldn't have been more friendly and helpful. Everywhere there were people pointing us in the right direction and giving us tips for a better stay. We rated our hotel as one of the best on the trip. We decided to fly to Dharamshala instead of taking the train or overnight bus. Even though we wanted to see the countryside between Delhi and the north we are just getting tired of long journies. Landing at Dharamshala airport we were both amazed at the mountainous terrain surrounding us. Very beautiful place. Our taxi ride to McLeod Ganj was a stunning and exciting experience. Single lane switchbacks for almost 40 minutes took us higher and higher into the mountains with occasional vistas into the valley below. We were excited to see free flying Indian ringnecked parakeets with their signature long green tail feathers. We arrived at our hotel and dropped our bags, heading out to explore the very narrow streets shared by vendors, vehicles, cows, dogs, people and baboons. We were in search of the gems of India - rubies, emeralds, sapphires and amethysts. Lots of these in various forms - raw, polished, cut, set, loose. Very fun. We had two days to explore this amazing place before we started our volunteering.

On Monday morning we arrived at Lha, only a ten minute walk from our hotel. Rabsel the volunteer coordinator is a welcoming and funny Tibetan man who also cooks at a great local restaurant. Since the organization is inundated with volunteers this week and next, we were only needed for conversational English for an hour each late afternoon. We asked if we could do more so Rabsel called another Charitable Trust in Dharamshala called Tong-Len and set us up to meet with them the following day. Dharamshala is a community below where were we were staying so we were informed to catch a jeep, which is the most reasonable form of transportation down the steep and winding road. We were also advised to purchase an extra seat so that we wouldn't be squished given they will not leave unless there are three people plus the driver in the front, four people in the back seat (which comfortably fits three), and across the very back there are two small bench seats facing each other awaiting three passengers each. So, in total this very small vehicle transports 13 people. Needless to say I (Kellie) purchased an extra seat so Shelley and I and one other person shared the middle bench seat.

After arriving at the Tong-Len office, which was on the third floor of an old building, we emerged from a steep stairway to the most amazing view of the mountains. Shelley and I both commented on this vista. We were then graciously met by a man named Tenzin, who was our connection to this charitable organization. He explained a bit about Tong-Len's history and what they are working on, and Shelley and I both instinctively knew that we were going to be humbled and grateful to be connected to this special place. Tong-Len is an organization that was originally started by a Tibetian monk named Jamsang who was moved by the plight of the numerous Indian children who were homeless, living in slums, eating garbage, and learning the skills of begging. In 2002 he attempted to provide schooling for these children. Given his initial attempts to help these children were not very successful, he did not give up and redesigned the organization to more fully meet the needs of these individual children. Over time the organization has transformed into what we would call a group home setting, containing dorm rooms, classrooms, learning centers and space for overall development. Shelley and I were taken there to meet with the director Jamyang (or Guruji to the children) to find out what we could do to help. Upon arriving at the "hostel" as they call it, the grounds were a flurry of activity. Some of the older children were outside painting new panels to express some relevant ideas they were being taught, others were playing cricket in a makeshift cricket pitch, while others were spending time with volunteers and visitors. Immediately we felt that we were in a special place that was contributing to change the lives of many children.

We met Jamyang who appeared very happy to meet us and had a definite plan regarding how we could help. He proceeded to provide an overview of Tong-Len and we were both touched by hearing his story. At this time, he was hoping that we could assist a former student of Tong-Len's, who was currently attending university. She would be arriving the following day and was tasked with writing an article and creating a promotional video on a key concept that Tong-Len is trying to generate, the concept of Secular Ethics. Given that this young woman's success was due in part to secular ethics (we will provide link to video for explanation), her story was important to Tong-Len.

Once we left the center we returned to the town to meet Sarju, our friend Jenny's dear friend. Sarju is a warm, kind and quick to laugh man who delighted us with stories during a delicious lunch. He then was happy to escort us into the bazaar to buy fabric and find a tailor to have day suits made (kameez shalwar). This was a whirlwind of activity with fabric flying and Sarju snapping pictures and translating! Kellie and I decided on fabric and then went across the street to the tailor. We were late for our conversation class in McLeod Ganj but I joined a group anyway. Kellie went for a nice cold beer as all the rooms were full. The next morning we grabbed a jeep and made our way to Dharamshala. We met the delightful Nisha and got down to work. It was an exciting day interacting with the staff and children, many of whom had gone home for Diwali. Yes, we inadvertently planned well as Diwali was occurring while we were visiting India! Nisha Kumari was born in the slum community of Dharamshala. And yes for the politically correct among us, they call themselves slum people. Nisha was taken to Tong-Len as a child and is now almost finished university. She is delightful to be with and loves her family of origin dearly. Over the next three days we worked with Nisha on three articles for publication in various media, an interview with Nisha and I (Shelley) and a promotional video. We also worked with Tenzin who is struggling to develop social emotional curriculum. Since this is Kellie's and my forte and a subject close to our hearts we were very happy to support with this project. Diwali was certainly celebrated loudly with more firecrackers than fireworks so Kellie and I got to take it all in. Oh, I haven't mentioned the food! The healthiest we have eaten so far and yummy beyond our expectations. We have been spoiled at Tong-Len with delicious lunches each day that come with smiles, hugs and hand holding by the children. No lack of affection here.

Our conversational English classes at Lha are reciprocal learning as Kellie and I are getting an education on Tibetan culture, Buddhism, political issues and the persevering yet gentle nature of Tibetan refugees. It seems an unfair exchange when all we have to do is speak our native language! Again we are given a gift when we expected to be the givers. A great lesson for us. We participated in a garbage clean up morning on the Saturday. After two hours of picking up trash along three roadsides, we were treated to lunch at the soup kitchen. Kellie elected to give the lunch a miss to sort out some job application technical issues. I had a date after the lunch to go to a special monastery south of Dharamshala with one of my students. She had asked me at the beginning of the week if we could go together. She is in India for one year to learn English. She is living with her uncle who is a bodyguard and translator for His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Since the Dalai Lama's first name is Tenzin, there are many Tibetans, both male and female, with this name. My young lady was no exception! On Sunday we went to Dharamshala to pick up our shameez kalwar and have lunch with a group of Kellie's students who had also arranged this with us on the first dpromotKellie was excited to learn how to make momos (Tibetan dumplings) and the other dishes being prepared. With six cooks in the kitchen we made quick work of a meal that takes a long time to prepare.

On Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday we worked with Nisha on a promotional video for Tong-Len, videoing faces of people from all over each saying one word describing a common value we all share. If you go to www.Tong-Len.org you will see the two videos we worked on there. These should be available the first week of November. Wednesday, was our last day at Tong-Len and Shelley's birthday! At Tong -Len we said our goodbyes, exchanged contact info and expressed how grateful we both were to have met everyone there, and if even for a short time, been a small part of this organization which is playing such a large role in changing people's lives. That night we had a lovely birthday dinner and returned to our room to strategically pack our bags. This experience here has touched both of us and we have spoken about one day returning.

Bhagsu falls hike

Bhagsu falls hike

Bhagsu falls hike

Bhagsu falls hike

Bhagsu falls hike

Bhagsu falls hike

Shelley in front of Bhagsu falls

Shelley in front of Bhagsu falls

All relaxing for the day

All relaxing for the day

View from our hotel restaurant

View from our hotel restaurant

More mountain shots from Mcleod Ganj

More mountain shots from Mcleod Ganj

Shelley at temple prayer wheel in McLeod Ganj

Shelley at temple prayer wheel in McLeod Ganj

Interesting sign at monastery

Interesting sign at monastery

Kellie being hennaed by one of the students at Tong-Len

Kellie being hennaed by one of the students at Tong-Len

Amazing vista at office for Tong-Len

Amazing vista at office for Tong-Len

Streetscape in lower Dharamshala

Streetscape in lower Dharamshala

Sneaking in a smooch with Nisha

Sneaking in a smooch with Nisha

Working with students from Tong-Len

Working with students from Tong-Len

Shelley and Nisha

Shelley and Nisha

Sign for LHA, one of the organization we volunteered with

Sign for LHA, one of the organization we volunteered with

One of the students at Tong-Len taking a selfie

One of the students at Tong-Len taking a selfie

Picking fabrics for our Indian suits

Picking fabrics for our Indian suits

Picking fabrics with Sarju

Picking fabrics with Sarju

The Tong-Len crew

The Tong-Len crew


Nisha is tired

Nisha is tired


Parade of children at TCV celebration

Parade of children at TCV celebration

Chalk artistry at TCV

Chalk artistry at TCV

Selfie with Tenzin and Nowa

Selfie with Tenzin and Nowa

Lunch with some of the LHA students

Lunch with some of the LHA students

Lunch at Tenzin's

Lunch at Tenzin's

Banners at TCV celebration

Banners at TCV celebration

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNgfZNx6s3A
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MWtiA4tzO0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3RmCW4J8qs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4n0Tw8TJ_Y
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYcHsglHcgY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvocFkQgqhk

Posted by kelshell 12:51 Archived in India Comments (0)

Uhh Ohh, ran out of money!

Hello there, Kellie here! I am so sorry to report that my traveling days are coming to an end. I have decided after much deliberation that I need to return home and get a job! I have enjoyed this 4 month adventure and wish it could have lasted 5. Shelley will carry on with our itinerary, making some adjustments. She will continue on to Nepal for the safari, then head to Sri Lanka. After that she will return to Tanzania for a bit and then meet her son Micah in Iceland.

I am looking forward to spending some time with my family in Toronto before heading back to the island. This trip has been life changing and I am sad to not finish. Shelley has been an amazing travel partner and I know she keep writing this blog. I look forward to reading her adventures!

Thanks for your readership and it has been incredible.

So long,
Kellie

Posted by kelshell 08:57 Comments (4)

Zanzibar

The spice island

sunny 35 °C

Zanzibar. Ocean breeze, turquoise water, spices, snorkeling, relaxing. What could be better! That's what we thought. Somehow though Zanzibar fell flat. We felt it immediately. A sense of desperation seemed to permeate the atmosphere here. On the first day we walked for 20 minutes to the “best beach.” The sand here in Zanzibar and in particular in Nungwi where we were is quite lovely. It is fine, white in texture and looks beautful against the bright turquoise water … if we could see the water, the tide was so far out! We wondered when we could get into the water. Maybe 1:30 we were told. So we settled in under an umbrella. After waiting for a bit I decided to make my way through the urchins to snorkel. Kellie stayed behind. I will mention that we had already picked up a friend wanting to sell us a snorkeling tour because we had also found out that there is little to see from the beach here, I was happy to discover that there were fish and brightly colored starfish to be seen in this area. After Kellie joined in and the tide had come in quite far, we were able to swim, snorkel and enjoy. We paid a deposit to our friend “Captain Shah” who proceeded to try and befriend us with buying a small bottle of Konyagi (the local gin), and we all had a few gin and tonics on the beach. Despite being able to do some limited snorkeling from the beach front, we were looking forward to a more significant snorkel experience on Mnemba Island the next day. So, after a sun-filled day Shelley and I returned to our bungalow for dinner and rest. While a bungalow near the beach does sound inviting, Shelley and I both found our chosen accommodation to be lacking. Given our overall budget, throughout our trip we were often challenged with our places to stay which were often a slight step up from a backpackers hostel. Here in Zanzibar, while our place was large, the surroundings were very forested and dark, our air-conditioning didn't work, and the shower often was lacking in hot water. On the property we were staying they did have a turtle conservation area, which was cool, however we both questioned how relaxed these turtles were given that people were allowed to swim with them in a rather small, stagnant water area. On this night we decided to order food from a local cafe that served our hotel. After our meal we settled in for a good night sleep to prepare for our snorkel tour to Mnemba Island, or so I thought! The best laid plans were thwarted in the night as Kellie woke up with food poisoning which continued unabated into the early morning. If anyone has had food poisoning it really does feel like you are dying. This was no exception. Since Kellie had never had it, she was going through a list of travel maladies (do you think it's malaria?) but we were pretty sure what it was. In the morning she insisted that I leave for the day as she would be sleeping. I started walking down the beach.

When I caught up with Shah he said he'd already paid for us but it was okay, we could go any day. I gave him the rest of the money and returned to the room where Kellie fitfully slept. On Saturday we explored around our end end of the beach and had dinner at a high end hotel restaurant near us. It was the night of the full moon (yes we had been invited to many full moon parties) and we enjoyed our dinner on the pier with no land in sight, imagining the hundreds of miles of ocean between where we were and likely Southeast Asia. The dinner was very good despite Kellie's hesitation to eat as she had definitely regained her appetite. At this hotel there were many conferences and groups of people staying so they had an African band set up on the pier which meant we could relax, taking in the warm coastal breeze, listening to music and having a front row seat to the tremendous full moon. While our plans for Zanzibar hadn't turned out exactly how we expected, this night did make up for some of that, and it was a special experience to witness this full moon casting it’s light across the Indian Ocean.

The following morning we awoke ready for a snorkel day on Mnemba Island. With mask and snorkel in hand Shelley and I made our way down the beach. Halfway there we see Shah approaching us. We both looked at each other and thought uhh ohh, this might not be good? Shah explained that he had already paid for our snorkel for the previous day and we didn't show up. Shelley explained that she was told we could come any day, and today was our day. Needless to say, Shah had spent our money and now needed more money to pay the actual captain. While he insisted that he had paid a captain already, when we attempted to corroborate his story, it was clear that he had not paid anyone. He insisted he could make it work if we just pay him more money. Shelley and I refused and returned to the beach area where people were loading onto boats. Shelley asked the snorkel outfit where the police were that we had seen on the beach the other day. After several minutes we were told if we had $10 each, a different boat could accommodate us. The usual price for the trip was $25-30 per person and we had already paid Shah for $20 each. We both figured we should pay this small amount extra and get on our way. We are not certain if Shelley's inquiry into the police helped our situation, given they didn't want any problems, but we paid the extra and boarded the boat for Mnemba.

Mnemba Island is owned by Bill Gates. Snorkeling is allowed on the reefs around the island. At first it seemed like a pretty dead reef, the fate of so many reefs around the world today. However, we soon began to see fish, lots of fish. The quantity and variety of fish was amazing. There were maroon clowns guarding their anemones and some large feather dusters. There was very little hard and soft coral but as usual, we were the last ones in the boat. Kellie almost couldn't get back in due to the strong current, something that had also surprised us at our local beach. After lunch on a private beach across from Mnemba we motored back to Nungwi aided by a sail and strong winds.

On our last day at Nungwi we just wandered around and then packed for our pick up Tuesday morning. We were picked up at 9 for a spice tour near Stonetown. The spice tour was very informative. Many of the spices grown on Zanzibar were brought here by Arab people when they settled the Island hundreds of years ago. In fact, Zanzibar is 95% Muslim with a smaller island off the coast being 100% Muslim. We were surprised to find out that black pepper grows on a vine and fresh nutmeg is the most striking colour of brown and vibrant red. We tasted fresh picked cardamom, cloves, cinnamon bark, black pepper, cacao, turmeric (couldn't get the yellow off our teeth for days) and ate fresh coconut. We tried pomelos, two types of oranges, jack fruit (I like durian better!), banana and pineapple. It's funny how different the various pineapple varieties taste around the world. After buying fresh spices we headed for Stonetown for our short boat ride to Prison Island. Originally intended to be an actual slave warehouse, slaving was abolished by the British before its completion. So it became a place for British administrative personnel and is now a Seychelle tortoise sanctuary and a snorkeling spot. We got to snorkel on the healthier coral reef for an hour and this time saw more hard and soft coral than fish. Most of the reef was dead but we could tell it must have been stunning in its heyday. We wished we had spent less time in Nungwi and more time in Stonetown as it has a rich and colorful history and beautiful Zanzibar doorways and doors. Early to bed on this last night for our early morning flight to Delhi. Again with WiFi issues we have beautiful underwater footage to share when we can.

Local guy showing off a different kind of starfish

Local guy showing off a different kind of starfish

Amazing right from shore

Amazing right from shore

Just looked down and they they all were!

Just looked down and they they all were!

Nungwi beach with tide out

Nungwi beach with tide out

Baobab tree, we even drank fresh juice from the fruit

Baobab tree, we even drank fresh juice from the fruit

Not our hotel but we ate here

Not our hotel but we ate here

Shelley relaxing on the pier

Shelley relaxing on the pier

Full moon over Zanzibar

Full moon over Zanzibar

View to ..... Southeast Asia?

View to ..... Southeast Asia?

Hollow tree with cotton like pods for stuffing mattresses

Hollow tree with cotton like pods for stuffing mattresses

Kellie's palm frond frog

Kellie's palm frond frog

Nutmeg

Nutmeg

Pineapple

Pineapple

Jackfruit

Jackfruit

Our palm frond finery

Our palm frond finery

Stonetown beach

Stonetown beach

Zanzibar door

Zanzibar door

Stonetown from the water

Stonetown from the water

On the way back from Prison Island

On the way back from Prison Island

Prison Island

Prison Island

Seychelles tortoise

Seychelles tortoise

Feeding the tortoise

Feeding the tortoise

Kellie and the tortoise

Kellie and the tortoise

I should know this spice but I forget!

I should know this spice but I forget!

Not sure if this is Kilimanjaro? Leaving Tanzania...

Not sure if this is Kilimanjaro? Leaving Tanzania...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79VcHYALvvQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VDU8D-tXo7I
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XzHQMj2Xzgs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lMs7ElvYPnw

Posted by kelshell 18:50 Archived in Tanzania Comments (1)

Finally getting some Kenya safari pictures

Well we have been working on downloading our pictures from our great safari in Kenya. Below are most of our pictures. Unfortunately, my videos of this experience are still not available. We will post them as soon as we can. In addition to our safari pics, we have included a few shots from our tour of the Maasai village. We hope you enjoy!

Ginea fowl

Ginea fowl


Impala grazing

Impala grazing

Giraffe being curious

Giraffe being curious

Baby elephant making his way

Baby elephant making his way

IMG_3625

IMG_3625

Lion pride

Lion pride

More lions

More lions

Yes more lions

Yes more lions

Selfie from jeep

Selfie from jeep

Lying and relaxing

Lying and relaxing

Shelley from the jeep

Shelley from the jeep

Sun set in Maasai Mara

Sun set in Maasai Mara

Sunset pic

Sunset pic

OK last one - sunset

OK last one - sunset

Wildabeast and zeebra

Wildabeast and zeebra

Cheetahs chow'in down

Cheetahs chow'in down

Cheetahs having breakfast

Cheetahs having breakfast

Vultures devouring an eland

Vultures devouring an eland

Wildebeest with oxpeckers helping with the fleas

Wildebeest with oxpeckers helping with the fleas

Ostrich sighting - hello there

Ostrich sighting - hello there

Lazy lion

Lazy lion

Mama lion looking for her cubs

Mama lion looking for her cubs

Majestic ostrich

Majestic ostrich

Pair of giraffe very curious

Pair of giraffe very curious

Can't get enough of these guys

Can't get enough of these guys

Yup, more

Yup, more

And more...

And more...

In awe of the mighty mama and babe

In awe of the mighty mama and babe

Lonely rhino - another of the big five spotted

Lonely rhino - another of the big five spotted

A troop of baboons

A troop of baboons

Selfie, pinch me I'm actually on safari!

Selfie, pinch me I'm actually on safari!

Elephants on the move

Elephants on the move

Hippo heaven

Hippo heaven

They like their water and the sun

They like their water and the sun

A little lizard trying to find shade

A little lizard trying to find shade

Overland shot

Overland shot

Picture of Mara river where migration can occur

Picture of Mara river where migration can occur

More grazing zeebras

More grazing zeebras

Buffalo - one of the big five to spot

Buffalo - one of the big five to spot

Eland

Eland

Huge buffalo

Huge buffalo

Coexistence

Coexistence

Lions with their cubs

Lions with their cubs

Still can't stop taking pics

Still can't stop taking pics

Rhino

Rhino

Vulture in search of more

Vulture in search of more

He approached us!

He approached us!

Finding relief from the sun

Finding relief from the sun

She was a bit curious

She was a bit curious

More wildebeests

More wildebeests

Crazy close

Crazy close

Brother cheetas relaxing after their meal

Brother cheetas relaxing after their meal

Beautiful

Beautiful

Circle of life in true colour

Circle of life in true colour

Bye bye giraffe

Bye bye giraffe

Beautiful Maasai women selling her crafts

Beautiful Maasai women selling her crafts

Shelley honing her bargaining skills with Maasai

Shelley honing her bargaining skills with Maasai

Maasai man in front of his village

Maasai man in front of his village

Selfie with Maasai man

Selfie with Maasai man

Our safari group in Maasai village

Our safari group in Maasai village

Maasai man wearing lion head from lion that got into village

Maasai man wearing lion head from lion that got into village

Maasai woman outside her home

Maasai woman outside her home

Posted by kelshell 07:22 Comments (0)

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