A Travellerspoint blog

September 2017

Walking with the animals

Priceless

sunny 22 °C

We arrived in Kenya after flying from Sofia to Istanbul with an eight hour layover before flying on seven more hours to Jomo Kenyatta airport in Nairobi. We had arranged a shuttle for our 2:00 a.m. landing but our shuttle wasn't waiting for us so a nice taxi driver called our hotel for us. He warned us that our hotel was newer but the area was rough. He was so right! The local neighborhood was set amongst streets (can they be called that?) which to us would be single really badly potholed dirt tracks. As we checked into our hotel, I (Kellie) was a bit discouraged to see that once again we had to go up stairs - 5 flights in total! There is just no getting away from this fact. In the mid morning when we awoke, the hustle and bustle of this predominantly light industrial area greeted us. We were in auto parts central with any car part you could wish for being dragged, carried, rolled or pushed. Since we had been advised to not venture out, even in the daytime, we needed to bite the bullet to find a bank machine as we had no Kenyan shillings. So out we went! We were definitely not in a tourist area and stood out like sore thumbs but the people were welcoming, friendly and very helpful. We wandered around, got some cash and arranged our matatu for Lake Naivasha for Wednesday.

Shelley and I were both prepared to take this local mode of transportation even though some were surprised we were going to take this squished in, fill all 14 seats (including large bags of corn or grain or whatever). Our destination was 1 hour and 40 minutes away and we couldn't resist the 300 Kenyan shilling price tag ($3.40). One of our worries though was the wait until the van got full, we just wanted to get on the road. Our van organizer Lydia, who was lovely, assured us "not long". Well, after waiting over 1 hour and a half in our seats, we got out of the van for a stretch. I guess we were definitely on Kenyan time, and we heard " hakuna matata" several times. When the van finally filled we were on our way. Driving through Nairobi it is like you may imagine, beautiful faces, densely populated, dirt, garbage, laughter, poverty... Such a mixture of things that it is difficult to describe. Given the area we were in, Shelley and I were both looking forward to leaving Nairobi and heading to nature and the animals and wildlife that Kenya is known for.

The accommodation we booked was called Guesthouse Jane in their tree house. It is a place on a property that has other guest rooms. Our place was for the budget traveler and we were excited to actually see what it would be like. We were pleasantly surprised to find a raised basic cottage type room that you entered by ascending a ladder-type structure. Inside was a room filled with bunk beds that you climbed a ladder to access and one bed only three steps up. We had a small room with a toilet and sink (when I say small I mean I practically have to stand on the toilet to close the wooden door). But, it worked. Our shower was outside below this raised structure. Our beds were equipped with mosquito nets and we did have electricity. Not quite glamping, but great for less than $20 per person a night, including breakfast. Shelley and I arranged for a taxi that afternoon to take us to a private animal sanctuary on Crescent Island. We did not know what to expect, and we were definitely in for a treat! We were surprised to discover that we were left to walk around the grounds. We could meet up with a guide along the way, or just go on our own. So, away we went.

I think we were both thinking, what kind of animals are we actually going to see walking alone here? Then, boom several zebras appeared to our right. We both looked at each other, jaws dropped at this amazing sight. We stopped for a while to take this in. Once we started walking again we met up with a guide who stayed with us explaining everything we were seeing. The list included Thompson's gazelles, impalas, wildebeests, water bucks, giraffes, zebras, eagles, superb starlings, ibis, guinea fowl to name a few. We had gotten here later in the afternoon and only had a few hours before the animal sanctuary closed - 6:30 is nightfall here! We would have enjoyed spending a whole day! Our up close and personal experience was a once in a lifetime experience we won't forget. The following day we hired a taxi for the day and set off for Lake Oloiden to see hippos and flamingoes. Unfortunately we found out that the flamingoes stopped coming last year. Bummer! But we saw three hippo heads coming up for air so waited patiently on the shore for about an hour for them to come out to bask. Since it was cloudy they didn't come out so we got back in the car and proceeded to our next destination, Crater Lake. We paid for lunch here which included the conservation area fee. After a nice lunch on the lake we were instructed how to hike around the lake and up the crater to the conservation area. We were to meet our driver at a parking lot in the conservation area. We set off, seeing beautiful birds and butterflies on the confusing unmarked trail system. We were told we might be lucky enough to even see a leopard! And it's safe! After a few twists and turns we finally made our way upward (Kellie was a trooper) and came out to the Savannah. We followed his instructions to go through the fence and saw a few zebras, gazelles, impalas and warthogs. We didn't see a parking lot anywhere. We walked and walked and walked. We finally realized that we were lost and headed toward some buildings down a road. Two men working at a water plant came out to talk to us and kindly called our driver who had to be instructed step by step while he literally drove cross country to reach us. We were miles away and almost at our first destination! Everyone got a kick out of our situation, including us!

On Friday we decided to take a boat ride on Lake Naivasha. We took a matatu to a local public beach where we were met by two men who happened to have a boat! And even though we had been overcharged for the matatu, these young men actually quoted the local price. They were both very knowledgeable about the surrounding wildlife, especially the birds. Before getting into the boat they took us to an area where we saw Marabu storks.These birds were massive both in body size and beak. These birds would hang around the fish cleaning area awaiting scraps, or trying to be thieves. It was odd but wonderful being so close to such large birds. They were not afraid of us at all. As we entered the boat we were assured we would see many types of birds, hippos, and possibly even watch a Fish Eagle swooping to catch a fish. Lake Naivasha is not a very deep lake, and is fresh water fed, which of course means no flamingoes, sorry Shelley. While maneuvering through the water, we spotted several species of birds including: white storks, Egrets, white pelicans, bald eagles, and even went to the living area of cormorants (including both black and white headed), where we saw trees teeming with these birds. In addition to viewing this vast selection of birds (the area bosts over 400 species), the boat came about 100 feet away from a yawning hippo! I wish I was ready with my camera to catch this site, but sadly I was not. Their jaw opening is as you would imagine, just like a National Geographic photograph. At this point the boat pulled into a shore area where we disembarked and made our way slowly to an area where there was a hippo heading into the water. Despite its massive size, it was surprisingly graceful. We also managed to walk a bit further to see a second hippo on land feeding. We were told that in this area, hippos are sometimes coaxed out of the water with food so tourists can see more than just their heads peeking out of the water. Hippos usually stay in the water, and typically only come out at night, or occassionally come out to bask in the hot African sun. One of our guides also told me that in the family of hippos me saw, there is only one male. If another male hippo is born, he is often killed by the father. At times the mother hippo can send the male away. Talk about male domination.

Seeing the hippos was a great sight, and we also circled around Crescent island where we saw giraffes, water bucks, and huge buffalos from the water's edge. After the shoreline views of Crescent Island, we went to where our boat captain was going to feed the fish eagles some fish that we purchased on our way from local fisherman dragging their nets in Lake Naivasha. Our guide stopped the boat, whistled a few times to get the fish eagle's attention, then threw the fish into the air. As it landed in the water a large fish eagle swooped down and grabbed it in it's talons and flew away with the free snack. This snack was not free for us, we spent 150 kshillings (less than $2.00) and it was worth every penny! Soon after this we headed back to shore feeling very satisfied with the bird sightngs and of course the hippos. We thanked our guides for a wonderful experience and headed on our way back. Knowing that there were only two cheap options for transport back to town, we opted to try a boda-boda, which is basically jumping on the back of a motorcycle, like the native Kenyans, and hoping for the best. Shelley and I had our two motorcycle drivers drop us at the only souvenir shop we had seen, where we met a lovely lady and purchased some Kenyan made crafts. The owner of the shop offered us a ride back to our hotel as he was heading into town. All in all a great day experiencing life on Lake Naivasha, as well traveling Kenyan style.

On Saturday we waited at our guesthouse to ride back to Nairobi with the owner. Despite having the whole day, the WiFi was so slow that we could not upload much. Now back in Nairobi we are needing to sleep for our safari tomorrow morning so will post what we have. Off to the Masai Mara .....

View of Lake Naivasha from Crescent Island

View of Lake Naivasha from Crescent Island


Walking in Nairobi

Walking in Nairobi

KelShel selfie in the matatu

KelShel selfie in the matatu

Acacia trees on Crescent Island

Acacia trees on Crescent Island

Walking beside the zebras

Walking beside the zebras

Monkey sighting

Monkey sighting

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJpcb2Giabc
https://youtu.be/xezIomwS7vw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hP9wQPinis0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2W6-oC06u3A

Posted by kelshell 18:20 Archived in Kenya Comments (0)

A shitload of shillings

New currencies and other musings

sunny 26 °C

So we did a blog in Mongolia about all the things we found interesting about the country. Here we will give some interesting tidbits about our travel overall. By the way we are in Nairobi now and since it is highly recommended that we stay inside at night we have some time so here we go....

  • once you've seen a Cyrillic alphabet and figured out how to count letters and see commonalities you can find your way around (Russia, Mongolia and Bulgaria are Cyrillic)
  • we have to find a common reference point in Canadian for money for each country we visit. So we always pick 5 and 10 dollars so we can estimate costs - example in Kenya right now 1000 shillings is about 11.80 so at least it gives us a quick reference. Changing currencies regularly has us saying,"so $5 is this much in (tugrik, rubles, krona, lira, euro, koruna, forint, lei and lev) so far and now shillings.
  • not all toilet flushers are created equal - leaving one country and entering the next where you pulled up on the knob on the tank to flush results in lifting off the whole lid in the next; as for toilets there are the pay toilets, which does not mean paper; train and bus toilets - maybe/maybe not and Kellie has become quite good at charades to ask for toilet paper from train conductors - use your imagination; some have seats and some do not; some with seats have shoe prints on them - these are not squats ladies; most in Eastern Europe are co-ed; and some have very little water in the bowl and a high shelf for doing stool samples way easier.
  • door locks - what should be a simple lock and unlock procedure for 2 university grads.... "You try, now you try; it's 2 turns; pull it out part way; don't put it in all the way; try it twice it works better" - oh how the eavesdroppers must laugh - if they understand English.
  • asking for directions - reactions range from running away to getting in the rental car and directing from the back seat
  • towels and pillows- really matter! Some towels have given us exfoliation treatments
  • stairs and elevators that don't quite go to the top! And if your room is on the 3rd floor it is really on the 5th floor.
  • subway stations that make you go down and then back up - hmmm!
  • laundry - well we have had access to only two washing machines so far on this trip, which makes for a lot hand washing in bathroom sinks. There isn't usually a day that goes by where either Shelley or my underwear are hanging somewhere in the room. Often we tell hotel cleaning staff just to skip our rooms given the various pantaloons that are a strewn
  • trusting others - to trust or not to trust, that becomes a constant thought. Even though we would like to think strangers are offering assistance out of kindness, and maybe some are, we do find ourselves being extremely wary when all we would like to do is relax and be ourselves
  • coffee - its hard to get a good cup! Even in Eastern Europe and we have even come to rely on Nescafe 3 in 1 ( which is our Mongolia discovery, which is coffee, artificial creamer, and sugar all in one thin sleeve of tastiness)
  • trains, planes and automobiles - so many inconsistent rules regarding security (liquids must be in plastic bags/no bag/no one cares), carry-on weight for baggage may not be applied, Turkish Airlines still rocks!
  • jewellery, natural make up and shoe stores - very prolific everywhere. Shelley has been laughing at the outrageous shoes (to her) worn with tights, shorts, pants, dresses - who would wear that with that! And the stilettos and high wedge shoes on cobblestones and uneven pavement - and no broken ankles! Shelley has become a jewellery junkie and is keeping up with Kellie in this department! Most countries seem to have their individual special gems so it's a lot of fun!

Well we are off to sleep - Lake Naivasha shuttle experience first thing tomorrow. Should be an interesting adventure!

Posted by kelshell 16:49 Archived in Kenya Comments (1)

Rainbows over Romania

We found our pot of gold!

sunny 24 °C

Well our side trip to Romania certainly was worth the effort to get there! To explain about this side trip I will tell you a quick little story. In 2006 John and I had traveled to Crete and spent a day in Elafonisi which is to me still the most beautiful beach I have ever seen. It lies at the southwest tip of Crete on the Libyan Sea. While on Crete that trip we met a family who I stayed in contact with over the years. They invited us back in 2012 so we returned. After our visit with them in the North East, we did some other touring around and returned to Elafonisi for 3 days. We met a lovely young woman named Elena who was working there. Elena is from Romania and was working at a taverna/pension on the beach (the only one there I might add). She was working there in order to earn better money for her family than she could earn in Romania. This was her second full season away from her husband and 2 young children and she was really missing them. We stayed in touch over the last 5 years and thankfully Elena only spent one more season away from her family after our visit. She used her earnings partially to expand greenhouses on a family property. When I told Elena we would be in Eastern Europe she asked us to visit and Kellie and I were planning this from the outset.

Now Elena, Catalin and their beautiful children Teodora and Edy live in Northeastern Romania. How to get there from Hungary? For a Canadian perspective it would be like traveling from Calgary to Vancouver. We returned to Budapest from Tokaj region to take one train 7 hours to the Romanian town of Timorsoara and then a fifteen hour evening/night train to Pascani. The train travel was a story all on its own, including feuding drunks, sleeping on different seats throughout the night, Kellie being awoken over and over again to have the tickets checked, etc, etc - paint your own picture! One thing Kellie wants to mention here is the sight of me sleeping upright with a shirt over my head (to keep the train lights off my face), head bobbing as if I'd been hung. She really wanted to take a picture of this macabre vision but was too tired!

We were warmly met by Elena and Catalin at the Pascani train station. The children were at school until noon so Elena made us a wonderful breakfast all from their own produce. Kellie and I took our first bite of their greenhouse tomatoes and looked at each other astonished saying at the same time, "this is the best tomato I have ever tasted in my life!" Incredible!

Once the children returned, shy greetings were the order with them too nervous to practice their English. Edy dazzled us with his skills using a local Romanian toy and after a bag was packed for the family, we took off in the van for a 2 day amazing tour. Romania is stunning! So many landscapes and things we had never seen. Unique to this countryside in the NE are the following: haystacks ( old fashioned kind with stick in the center supporting the weight of the hay piled in a pyramid shape); beautiful housing architecture with no 2 houses the same; elaborate eavestrough systems stylized ornately; horse and buggies carting anything imaginable; huge cows tied in front yards; traditional handicrafts;

We drove to a region which housed a fort from the 1400s. Kellie had to stay behind and drink cappacino as the trek to the fort was steep and lengthy. The fort was a major stronghold under Stefan the Great's reign and repelled Turkish and Tartar forces. We then drove to a spectacular privately owned museum called Museum Popa where a man's lifetime collection of artifacts and his unique carvings were displayed. Neculai Popa was an eclectic sculptor and collector of archaeological evidence, icons, nave paintings and sculptures with numerous masks of his designs. At the museum we were taken around by Popa's daughter who was knowledgeable and helpful answering all of our questions, as well as explaining the cultural significance of the masks. We were also given a short performance by her using a goat body-type puppet that is tradionally used on December 31st in celebrations. We have taken a short video that hopefully we can post (when WiFi is strong enough). Once Shelley and I saw this goat, we immediately recognized this icon from a busker that was performing in Prague, some of you may remember the video we posted, which we found very funny.

Upon leaving this interesting and special place, it was off to the mountain region to find a place to sleep for the night. The drive was scenic and even though I kidded with Catalin about his fast driving, we saw some wonderful scenes so representative of this area of Romania. It was so cool to still see the traditional use of horses, people walking their cows on a lead ( getting them to another pasture we guessed) and the numerous styles of houses that I know Shelley mentioned previously but it needs mentioning again! Some styles were ornate styles looking more Turkish, while others were decorated with stucco appliques that provided decoration above windows and doors, and sometimes over complete walls. To talk about the sights here one must also mention the flowers! Gardens and beautifying individual homes is definitely one priority here. Lovely roses and Dahlias and other colorful flowers were abundant as we drove through on our way to the mountain lodge. Despite not being able to stay where Elena had hoped, due to the fact the place required a two night minimum stay (which we all thought was crazy given they had many rooms available and there were 6 of us in total and would also be eating and drinking there), we managed to settle in at a lovely traditional motel. This place was a great choice where the attending staff allowed Shelley and I to bring in our wines from Hungary to share for dinner. I was excited to try the Cabernet Franc I purchased from the Eger region, while Shelley opened her late harvest white from the Tokaj region. The wine was enjoyed by all, and we tried some traditional Romanian Raki. Dinner was of Romanian styled pork (smoked) with chicken and mushrooms in a cream sauce. Dinner here in Romania is also nothing without polenta! Yummy :).

When we got up in the morning we walked to the Monastery of Voronet. Elena explained that the blue color used was specific and called the " blue of Voronet." This monastery from 1488 was stunning! Outside there were murals of saints still in very good condition. Inside the murals were very well preserved and so beautiful. The domed roof was spectacular. We left this region to travel to another monastery called Humor. There is a new orthodox church built beside the old monastery here. Elena asked the priest if we could see the new church first and he unlocked it for us. Brand new murals greeted us here. Then we went into the old monastery built in 1530 for nuns and even got to watch some restoration work in progress. A beautiful drive into the Carpathian mountain range showed more of the beauty of this region of Romania. We left quickly though as we still had to go to Elena's parents for dinner and get Catalin off to work for his night shift. Dinner at the family home was super. Elena's mother had made traditional food which was delicious and we had Raki and wine made by her father. We saw the family chickens and Vietnamese pot bellied pigs. Before going back to Elena's apartment we visited their greenhouses, 4 very large structures growing the world's best tomatoes. Elena and Catalin work very hard at their greenhouses outside of their day jobs. We slept at their apartment and said our goodbyes to Elena early in the morning before she went to work and waited for Catalin to return from his night shift to take the children to school before driving us to the next town for our 6 hour bus to Bucharest. We stopped at their local corner store to buy some food for the bus and were astonished to see an advertisement on the store window for Cedar Creek wines made in the Okanagan! "It's a small world after all...."

We want to thank Elena, Catalin and their family for a most excellent time with them and their corner of Romania. Kellie and I both agree that a return trip to Romania is necessary! Thank you, thank you, thank you! Xoxoxo.

View from the fort

View from the fort

Teodora and Edy in the armory

Teodora and Edy in the armory

Stefan 1st

Stefan 1st

Church in fort

Church in fort

From left - Elena, Teodora, Edy and Catalin

From left - Elena, Teodora, Edy and Catalin

Horse and foal at Popa museum

Horse and foal at Popa museum

Masks in background

Masks in background

Traditional masks

Traditional masks

More masks

More masks

Traditional clothing

Traditional clothing

Neculai Popa

Neculai Popa

Exterior wall of Voronet monastery

Exterior wall of Voronet monastery

Shelley and Elena Voronet

Shelley and Elena Voronet

Outside Voronet

Outside Voronet

Inside the monastery

Inside the monastery

Domed roof Voronet

Domed roof Voronet

Elena's parents home eavestrough

Elena's parents home eavestrough

Edy and Teo in grandparent's corn crib

Edy and Teo in grandparent's corn crib

Elena's parents yard

Elena's parents yard

Shelley and a beautiful ceramic soba for heating house with wood

Shelley and a beautiful ceramic soba for heating house with wood

Romanian haystack

Romanian haystack

Double ended rainbow

Double ended rainbow

Humor monastery

Humor monastery

Humor monastery

Humor monastery

Humor monastery

Humor monastery

Humor monastery

Humor monastery

Humor monastery

Humor monastery

Humor monastery

Humor monastery

Outside old Humor Monastery

Outside old Humor Monastery

Beautiful roses

Beautiful roses

Humor monastery

Humor monastery

Icon

Icon

New Humor monastery

New Humor monastery

Inside monastery

Inside monastery

Inside new monastery

Inside new monastery

Tower monastery grounds

Tower monastery grounds

Long haired Romanian sheep

Long haired Romanian sheep

Carpathian mountains

Carpathian mountains

Elena and Shelley in the mountains

Elena and Shelley in the mountains

Mountain peak

Mountain peak

Old monastery

Old monastery

Monastery roses

Monastery roses

Elena, Teo and Shelley

Elena, Teo and Shelley


Double ended rainbow

Double ended rainbow

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tE63aR12v1w
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yZrdJWHNIxw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WfdLnNMUNk8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rag4p14aEkI
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5DpH6wX2sw

Posted by kelshell 21:02 Archived in Romania Comments (2)

Last days in Hungary

Eger and the Budapest Opera House

sunny 28 °C

After leaving the Tokaj region we traveled back toward Budapest to Miscolc and Eger. There are mineral baths at Miscolc so we stopped for a few hours. The baths are a series of cave mineral pools of varying degrees of temperature. Kellie had booked a mud bath (is it someone putting mud on me; am I alone; Oh it's a bath - is it my own mud?) and after this we went to a salt cave. We thought we'd be soaking in salt water in a cave but it was a sauna with 5 inches of salt on the floor and the walls were encrusted with salt. After swimming in the labyrinth of cave pools and feeling relaxed and rejuvenated we left to drive to Eger to explore caves of the region. We arrived too late though so walked around the town. This area was beautiful and definitely merited more time than we had. After sleeping there, we drove back to Budapest and went to our apartment beside the Opera House. We had a private tour because Kellie's knee required using the elevator, then got to watch 2 arias being sung by one of Budapest's opera singers.

Cave bath

Cave bath

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FzrDmQWZfI

Posted by kelshell 21:00 Archived in Hungary Comments (0)

Tokaj wine country experience

Delicious sweet white wines

sunny 22 °C

Well we are in Shelley's wine country here! What a gorgeous countryside the Tokaj region is. And the learning opportunities were just fascinating. Although Kellie knows a lot about wine, I did not. Now I can discern between wines that have been in oak barrels versus stainless steel tanks, differences in growing terrain creating different flavour and really enjoyed wine tasting for the first time. I could finally smell and taste the subtle aromas and flavors people talk about in wines. In the past all I could smell was alcohol or dry acidic smells. These wines have such character I really enjoyed the experience!

It is true, Shelley and sweet wines do go well together. I myself am a bit of a dry white wine lover so was a bit concerned thinking we would be inundated with super sweet syrupy whites. Well, was I in for a surprise! Not only does the Tokaj wine region produce great sweet wines, they also have amazing dry wines. Here we experienced several different grape varietals that were very new to me. To name one, the fermint grape, which is common here, is wonderful. We tasted this as a single varietal as well as well in blends. The volcanic earth here does impart amazing minerality to the wines, and I can say there was hardly ever a dry white that I tried that I didn't like. Often these wines spent time only in stailiess steel vats, so they were crisp and friuty and easy drinking. The whites that spent time maturing in Hungarian and/or French oak where wonderful with creamy notes and fuller body. To my surprise, the late harvest wines and the special Aszu wines, which are definitely sweet, were well balanced with enough acid content that I was able to completely appreciare their flavours. I think what was most amazing about this area was the vast amounts of cave tunnels, deep under the volcanic terrain, dripping literaly with this black noble mold that continues this aging process for these wines that makes them truly unique. As we were told only one other place in the world (Rhine Valley) can this mold be found, and while other countries have tried to reproduce this, they have not been successful. So, here we are, in a relatively tiny area of the world, enjoying an elixer that is completely unique to our world. On top of this, the wine is affordable and such a shame that we can't carry a case of it in our journey. As it stands, we have each purchased several bottles that we will have to drink in the coming days before heading off to Africa. As well Linda, after having all this wine, I can't even feel my knee pain!

large_20170907_075257.jpglarge_20170907_075234.jpg
Grof Degenfeld winery

Grof Degenfeld winery

Grof Degenfeld hotel and winery - 4 star

Grof Degenfeld hotel and winery - 4 star

Muppet eyes - too much wine

Muppet eyes - too much wine

Wine fun

Wine fun

Grof Degenfeld

Grof Degenfeld

Ford Focus

Ford Focus

Bodrog river

Bodrog river

Kellie and Agnes at Oremus winery

Kellie and Agnes at Oremus winery

View from Oremus

View from Oremus

Cave entrance at Oremus

Cave entrance at Oremus

Wine in caves

Wine in caves

Tasting cellar

Tasting cellar

Oak casks

Oak casks

Noble mould

Noble mould

Wine cellar caves

Wine cellar caves


Wine cellar caves

Wine cellar caves

Tasting in the cellar

Tasting in the cellar

Disznoko winery

Disznoko winery

Noble mould on cellar bottles

Noble mould on cellar bottles

https://youtu.be/8fLVBD0yabc
https://youtu.be/nqTLcn-qtZ8

Posted by kelshell 21:20 Archived in Hungary Comments (0)

(Entries 1 - 5 of 7) Page [1] 2 » Next